The ALS Canada Blog is a pilot project. We will be working towards publishing content in both English and French in the coming months. Please refer to the “Français” category to access blog posts that are available in French at this time.

Le blogue de la Société canadienne de la SLA est un projet pilote. Nous poursuivrons des travaux sur la publication d’un contenu de blogue en anglais et en français dans les mois à venir. Veuillez consulter la catégorie « Français » pour accéder aux entrées de blogue qui sont disponibles en français en ce moment.

Leveraging scientific advancements and open science to study ALS progression

ALS is a disease that gradually paralyzes people as motor neurons lose their ability to communicate with the muscles of the body and eventually die. But the problems are not only caused by changes inside motor neurons: the cellular environment...

Posted in: Research

Could studying yeast help to answer questions about how ALS progresses?

If you look at a picture of a cell in a science textbook, the internal structures look static and neatly organized. But living cells are bustling with numerous processes, converting nutrients into energy and making proteins that the body’s tissues...

Posted in: Research

Could touchscreen technology improve testing for cognitive impairment in ALS?

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a group of disorders caused by nerve cell loss in areas of the brain responsible for managing cognitive functions and voluntary movement. By itself, FTD, which is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s...

Posted in: Research

Comparing DNA profiles of Canadians with a similar heritage

Can whole genome sequencing reveal new genetic mutations in ALS?

Deep inside the nucleus of every cell in the body, DNA carries the master blueprint—the full set of genetic instructions needed for the body to grow, live and reproduce. DNA looks like a twisted ladder made from 3.2 billion pairs...

Posted in: Research

Most newsworthy research stories of 2017

In 2017, major scientific advances in Canada and internationally have led to significant and exciting progress in ALS research. Discoveries that increase our understanding of the disease are happening far more often than ever before and as a result many...

Posted in: Research

Can a guardian protein protect motor neurons from toxicity in ALS?

Proteins are the workhorses inside cells, responsible for almost all cellular functions. To perform their tasks correctly, they must fold into the right 3D shapes. If they take on the wrong shape, they can stick together and form clumps. If...

Posted in: Research