Q&A with Dr. David Taylor, VP, Research

This interview was originally posted on the Hitfar website in February 2017. Thank you to Hitfar for giving ALS Canada permission to re-post this content. Could you start by explaining the disease and its effects? ALS is a disease where the living wires, called motor neurons, that connect your brain to your muscles die. This means […]

ALS Canada Research Update

ALS research is at a significant tipping point, and we can now envision a future where ALS becomes a treatable condition. This was one of the highlights shared by Dr. David Taylor, Vice President of Research at ALS Canada, during a webinar presentation on June 13, 2017. The webinar was the first in a series […]

The ALS Canada Research Program

Today was the deadline for applications from the research community for three different types of funding through the ALS Canada Research Program. Applications are evaluated by an international panel of scientific experts through a peer review process, regarded as the international benchmark of excellence in research funding. This approach enables us to maximize the impact […]

Could state-of-the-art gene editing play a role in correcting genetic mutations linked to the development of ALS?

Research is increasingly demonstrating that genetic mutations play a significant role in the development of ALS: for example, the C9orf72 gene is one of the most prominent genetic causes of the disease. With the scientific community abuzz about CRISPR/CAS9, a state-of-the-art technology that enables scientists to precisely manipulate and edit genes in living organisms, the […]

A second ALS treatment, edaravone, has been newly approved in the United States

Highlights: The United States Food and Drug Administration recently approved edaravone (also referred to as Radicava and Radicut) for the treatment of ALS. It’s only the second ALS drug to be approved in the US. The first drug, riluzole, was approved more than 20 years ago. The ALS Association says the drug will be available […]